Getting David Copperfield or The Anti-Nervous Voice Medication

I love the dancing Snoopy gif in yesterday’s post. Tell me great news, I give you the dancing Snoopy gif if on hand. Dancing Snoopy quickly translates into a Facebook share. Unfortunately, the joke I wanted to make removed the strikethrough for girl leaving my sentence to look like:

This girl woman

Way to make me sound incoherent Facebook. I have enough problems telling Grammarly, yes, I did mean to end a sentence with a preposition. (I do want to thank you, Grammarly, for pointing out the wrong one if needed.)

Back to David Copperfield, the Dickens novel not the magician. What’s the big deal about an audiobook for this classic? Wrong question. It’s not ‘what’ but ‘who’ in this case:

Still miss the beard. Will take this stubble.

I call it a Valentine’s Day present to myself in the form of Audible’s subscription service. Sometimes I want a story in my ears, and this story came at the right time. It also comes in handy during a flight. You see, I didn’t start going on a plane until 2005. I don’t feel deathly scared, and I respect those needing a little bit more help, it’s more take offs and landings giving me the jitters.

Enter this guy and Dicken’s David Copperfield otherwise known as 36 hours of anti-nervous medication. Why not say ‘anti-anxiety’? I know people with the condition, and I don’t want to use the wrong term in a form meant to be light hearted. I get nervous like anyone. His baritone will calm me down, and I get to hear a story. For now, I save hearing it until I fly this frozen coop.


Visual Metaphor for inward, girlish emotion




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